ultrafacts:

Source For more facts, Click HERE to follow Ultrafacts

ultrafacts:

Source For more facts, Click HERE to follow Ultrafacts

2657 ♥

Reblogged from ultrafacts

dongstomper69:

stunningpicture:

Creative kid. More creative mom.

fucking idiot got owned

dongstomper69:

stunningpicture:

Creative kid. More creative mom.

fucking idiot got owned

208946 ♥

Reblogged from ruinedchildhood

107067 ♥

Reblogged from thuggrandma

morethanphotography:

Flow Away by tomkualii

morethanphotography:

Flow Away by tomkualii

51 ♥

Reblogged from morethanphotography

morethanphotography:

Thunder of Kraken by albanhenderyckxphotography

morethanphotography:

Thunder of Kraken by albanhenderyckxphotography

50 ♥

Reblogged from morethanphotography

5300 ♥

Reblogged from pleatedjeans

pizzapriince:

following back everyone until i find a tumblr gf♡

pizzapriince:

following back everyone until i find a tumblr gf♡

178078 ♥

Reblogged from breakinq

(Source: sizvideos)

173970 ♥

Reblogged from pika-brew

fiftythreecrimes:

cubebreaker:

Thanks to the recent addition of their own 21x41ft pool, dogs at Lucky Puppy in Maybee, Michigan got to have their very own doggy pool party.

when I die this better be what heaven looks like tbh

161836 ♥

Reblogged from bizarbazar

609 ♥

Reblogged from automotivated

coolator:

luigishallriseagain:

coolator:

okay why is that lady’s phone so big

UR GONNA COMMENT ON WHY THE PHONE IS SO FUCKING BIG???

it is exceptionally large

1020 ♥

Reblogged from coolator

flat6ix:

mitsukehh:

More noob shots.

M3 | F80

"Noob shots"

650+ notes

699 ♥

Reblogged from flat6ix

thedemon-hauntedworld:

Jupiter’s Great Red Spot from Voyager 1 Color Inverted
What will become of Jupiter’s Great Red Spot? Recorded as shrinking since the 1930s, the rate of the Great Red Spot’s size appears to have accelerated just in the past few years. A hurricane larger than Earth, the Great Red Spot has been raging at least as long as telescopes could see it. Like most astronomical phenomena, the Great Red Spot was neither predicted nor immediately understood after its discovery. Although small eddies that feed into the storm system seem to play a role, a more full understanding of the gigantic storm cloud remains a topic of continued research, and may result in a better understanding of weather here on Earth. The above image is a digital enhancement of an image of Jupiter taken in 1979 by the Voyager 1 spacecraft as it zoomed by the Solar System’s largest planet. NASA’s Juno spacecraft is currently heading toward Jupiter and will arrive in 2016.
Image Credit: NASA, JPL; Digital processing: Björn Jónsson (IAAA), Color: thedemon-hauntedworld

thedemon-hauntedworld:

Jupiter’s Great Red Spot from Voyager 1 Color Inverted

What will become of Jupiter’s Great Red Spot? Recorded as shrinking since the 1930s, the rate of the Great Red Spot’s size appears to have accelerated just in the past few years. A hurricane larger than Earth, the Great Red Spot has been raging at least as long as telescopes could see it. Like most astronomical phenomena, the Great Red Spot was neither predicted nor immediately understood after its discovery. Although small eddies that feed into the storm system seem to play a role, a more full understanding of the gigantic storm cloud remains a topic of continued research, and may result in a better understanding of weather here on Earth. The above image is a digital enhancement of an image of Jupiter taken in 1979 by the Voyager 1 spacecraft as it zoomed by the Solar System’s largest planet. NASA’s Juno spacecraft is currently heading toward Jupiter and will arrive in 2016.

Image Credit: NASA, JPL; Digital processing: Björn Jónsson (IAAA), Color: thedemon-hauntedworld

1263 ♥

Reblogged from shychemist


8 Minutes of the Earth’s Rotation
How I wish our planet’s movement was this apparent while staring at the night sky. It could probably make a lot more people realize just how tiny we are compared to this vast unexplored galaxy above our heads.
This is a stack of 70 pictures with a 5 second exposure each at ISO 3200 and f/2.2.
Photographed by: Paolo Nacpil

8 Minutes of the Earth’s Rotation

How I wish our planet’s movement was this apparent while staring at the night sky. It could probably make a lot more people realize just how tiny we are compared to this vast unexplored galaxy above our heads.

This is a stack of 70 pictures with a 5 second exposure each at ISO 3200 and f/2.2.

Photographed by: Paolo Nacpil

445735 ♥

Reblogged from delightfully-divine

(Source: duck7-motorsports)

3259 ♥

Reblogged from allthingsben